School Improvement: Student Success

SRI's education researchers examine and identify external and in-school strategies that enhance the student achievement and readiness of traditionally underserved youth and young adult populations as they transition from one stage of the education system to the next. We focus on interventions that lead to student success in school, college, and career and technical education.

Projects

teenage students in a classroom

SRI studied programs across several states that offer college enrollment to high school-age students, and recommended improvements.

two young students working at computers

SRI evaluated the impact of an initiative to create more high-quality educational options across Chicago.

six young children looking up at camera

SRI conducted a statewide evaluation of this program that provides home visiting, parenting education, and preschool programs to improve children's school readiness and other outcomes.

mother holding young son in her arms

SRI is studying the quality of child outcomes data reported by states to the federal government under Part C and Part B Preschool services of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

girl standing at blackboard with diploma and graduation cap drawn on it

SRI analyzed this program that offers resources for high school students to prepare for and succeed in college.

teacher with young students in classroom

Across the U.S., policymakers are experimenting with various strategies for improving educator quality and student achievement. SRI leads an evaluation of three closely related human capital management initiatives in Massachusetts.

teacher with young students in classroom

A collaborative study of California state policies that frame the first two years of a teacher’s career to better understand how these policies actually work.

Press Releases

high school students working together on a science lab experiment

SRI Education has released new data from a multiyear evaluation of the California Linked Learning District Initiative demonstrating that Linked Learning students are making greater progress toward high school graduation and college eligibility than their peers in traditional high school programs.

children in a computer lab

SRI will conduct a study of a new elementary school math curriculum in 52 West Virginia schools. The digital curriculum, created by Reasoning Mind, uses technology to increase student engagement and gives students and teachers instant feedback.

School Children

Helios Education Foundation is partnering with SRI by investing $1 million to seed a Center for Digital Learning in St. Petersburg, Florida. The Center will create a portfolio of digital learning projects to enhance student achievement in STEM subjects.

middle school children in a classroom with teacher looking on

New research makes clear that students doing well in seventh grade math are more likely to succeed in advanced math classes when they reach high school.

AP science class

New research study will provide the first experimental evidence on the effects of high school students taking an inquiry-based AP science course and whether it impacts educational progress and success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects.

Teacher with young students

SRI researchers are beginning an evaluation of the Midwest Expansion of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program, an intervention that provides comprehensive educational and family-support services to at-risk pre-kindergarten through third-grade children.

two students working at a computer

A new report from SRI International's Center for Technology in Learning compares the use of educational technology for K-12 students in 21 countries.

SRI In the News

California's Beginning Teachers: The Bumpy Path to a Profession

Julia Koppich and Dan Humphrey presented results from a 2013 study of California’s state policy system designed to shape beginning teachers’ careers, including induction, clear credentialing evaluation, and tenure.

Publications

Results from this evaluation show significant gains in student outcomes: students earned more credits in the first two years of high school, are more likely to be on track with the a-g credits they need for college eligibility, and report greater confidence in their life and career skills.

New results from a hierarchical linear model show that students in certified pathways across participating districts earned more credits in the 10th grade and were more likely to be on track to complete the a-g credits needed for college eligibility than similar peers in more traditional programs.

Head Start programs are required to set aside at least 10% of program slots for children with disabilities, but the percentage of children with disabilities served varies depending on the criteria used and source of the information.