R&D Projects | SRI International

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R&D Projects

This capacity building project will contribute to foundational knowledge about what is already known, and what needs to be studied, about K-12 online STEM education for students with learning disabilities and those with autism spectrum disorder.
Through A4L, we are exploring the measurement of noncognitive factors, learning processes, and learning behaviors in digital learning environments.
SRI’s mixed reality training system provides comprehensive mission rehearsal tools to improve warfighter training.
By playing a game, citizen scientists can help increase reliability of mission-critical software systems.
SRI provides high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and comprehensive physics-based system multibody dynamics (MBD) modeling
SRI is conducting a study investigating to what extent, when, and how online Algebra 1 courses serve different student populations, especially those who are historically disadvantaged.
Estimation of River Characteristics from Remote Sensing Data.
Called “the best training we’ve ever received” by participating soldiers, instrumented combat-readiness exercises for members of the National Guard develop life-saving skills prior to deployment.
SRI is researching the inferential validity, reliability, and effectiveness of formative assessments embedded within games.
SRI is developing the next generation of online learning tools to meet the needs of a changing workforce.
SRI combines data assimilation algorithms with hydrodynamic forecast models for high-resolution forecasts of nearshore oceanographic properties for coastal operations. 
SRI develops graphical user interfaces to help non-expert end users set up high-resolution nested wave and circulation models for ocean forecasting.
The SAVE framework supports training in virtual environments through automated assessment of learner performance and tools for content authoring.
SRI International uses virtual gaming environments to research online behavior across cultures.
Researchers have created a computer game that could transform the problem of proving software correctness.